Emotional Intelligence, Mental Health, self-perception

Walking in Silence with Storytellers

Why are you so petrified of silence?
Here can you handle this?
Did you think about your bills, you ex, your deadlines
Or when you think you’re going to die?
Or did you long for the next distraction?

Alanis Morrissette, “All I Really Want” (1995, Maverick/Warner Music Group)

Decades ago, when I first tried meditating, I could not sit for more than a couple of minutes at a time. A dozen or so years ago, when I finally got serious about the practice, I could finally get past the physical fidgets and sort myself out around chronic pain, but I couldn’t get around the Squirrel Brain for the longest time. The silence, as “they” like to say, was deafening, and my own thoughts would often redouble their efforts to drown it out.

Often, in the silence when I’m trying to fall asleep, I tell myself stories that are half Mary Sue fantasies, and half a way of setting up semi-lucid dreaming as I transition into sleep patterns. They often run on recurring, familiar themes with recurring, familiar characters, like favourite bedtime stories read to us repeatedly in childhood.

These two pieces of information are the backdrop to an experience I had in a guided meditation last week, during a training course in working with internal Parts. As part of the meditation, we were invited to notice what aspects of our thoughts or feelings wanted to follow us on this path in towards silence, and gently encourage those heel-dogging experiences to wait off to the sidelines and give us some space. It’s a lot harder than we think to try to distance ourselves from our own thoughts and feelings; even as a relatively seasoned short-term meditator, I still struggle with intrusive thoughts that just don’t like being ignored. And I don’t mean “intrusive thinking” the way we often do in psychotherapy; I just mean the kinds of everyday thoughts we have about things we need to do, meant to do, random memories, feeling flashes and reflections on things that happened in the day—the usual jibber-jabber of mental cognitive load.

As I engaged in the meditation, I managed to get most of the regular Intruders to fall away, and I was good for a while. But there’s a part of me that shows up, especially in the calm and quiet moments, that starts to spin up stories. Sometimes I think of this part as my Muse, and like typical Muse Moments they always seem to show up when I am least equipped to make notes about what might be a good storyline to flesh out; once a Writer, always a Writer, after all. One ignores the whimsical and fleeting visits by their creative Muse at one’s own peril. Sometimes this part simply likes to provide some internal companionable distractions to the quietness around me. It’s generally a soothing presence, more in line with calming me than getting me fired up with creative sparks. The version that showed up in the meditation definitely had this latter energy. And while it wasn’t necessarily the bent of the exercise to converse with our Parts when we’re supposedly walking towards Silence, I still opted to get curious about what it was doing here.

This part of me has been around since early childhood. Since I was old enough to understand and appreciate people reading to me or making up stories. I don’t have any specific memories of either of my parents reading me bedtime stories, but I know it must have happened as both my parents were avid readers and encouraged my own reading. Both my parents were also alcoholics. Once they drank themselves into a stupor, they would retreat to their separate spaces and not talk to themselves, each other, or me. There was a LOT of silence in my home as I was growing up. Most of my memories of childhood Christmases, for example, are of them starting with Galiano and vodka in the orange juice and being separately passed out by early afternoon. I would escape into the books I inevitably received that morning or was assembling my own toys. The house would be silent, and those stories would be the place to which I could flee and find companions, and engagement, and solace. I spent a lot of time alone as a child; on a farm until I was 7, and in the small town I grew up in from 8-19 (though at least in town I could and did make friends I could spend more time with, perilous and political as childhood and teenage relationships could be).

Silence was also a herald of uncertainty and instability for me: I never knew what kind of adult was going to come out of those silences. Was it going to be “drunk and hyperfocused on me”, “sober and hyperfocused on me”, “emotionally estranged and distant”, “calm and friendly”, “angry and antagonistic at each other”, “angry and antagonistic at me”, or any one of a random number of other states common to alcoholics. Escape into the stories I could explore in the silence gave me consistent refuge, and that was so invaluable to me as a child and teen, and probably explains why some of the inner-world storylines I developed in my younger years are still so strongly with me even well into my adulthood.

Most people have some kind of Storyteller part, often an intellectual, “thinking” part. This is the part of us that narrates or describes an experience we’re having, rather than standing down and allowing us to be fully in the emotional experience of the moment. Intellectualizing an experience often feels more normal, or even considerably safer, than allowing our feelings to come to the surface. Sometimes the Storyteller is our fully human need to make sense of a set of confounding circumstances, connecting the dots (rationally or not) to create a narrative that makes sense at least to us, if no-one else, that we can run with as if it were incontrovertible FACT. Sometimes this Storyteller part is so strong that it retells the same story, over and over until it is a well-polished, almost scripted delivery.

Years ago, my friend and Dora-award-winning actor and director Philip Akin shared this piece of perspective on directing Shakespeare. He said you can always tell when an actor has no clue about the meaning of the words coming out of their mouths, because they simply seem to “drop out of” the lines, and if you know what to look for as a director, it’s an easy thing to spot. The words are there, but the presence of the character or actor inside them just disappears for a moment. I began to notice that in my work as a theatrical director and at some point, in the clinical office, I began to notice that with my clients as well. I could more readily spot when something they were saying to me felt like that polished script, because emotionally they would kind of “drop out” in the same way actors do. I started to get curious about what those words meant to them, and sure enough, more often than not I’d get variations on the theme of, “That’s just how it’s been for years.” They have created such a familiar and refined narrative that they can safely disconnect any emotional content from the words and recite the words now without any risk of recurring pain from vulnerable and tender lived experience.

Now I know that in the moment, I’ve been in the presence of their Storytellers. These are the parts of their internal processing system that carry the load of explaining their internal experiences to the outside world in ways that seem palatable in whatever ways seem necessary to that external audience. These recitations have become polished deliveries based on repetition and refinement based on the speaker’s perception of how Others are receiving and responding to those stories. We tweak the recitations to elicit some specific responses and minimize others, thus controlling the engagement and/or the environment in which we are ostensibly revealing some quasi-vulnerable part of ourselves—this identifies the Storyteller as what Internal Family Systems terminology recognizes as a Manager. Its job is to mitigate outward circumstances that could lead to harm, for example by controlling the narrative during disclosures, or (as in my case) protecting a child from the pain of isolation and profound loneliness.

It was lovely to have a few moments alone recognizing the presence, and now appreciating the workload, of my own Storyteller. It was nice to have the container of a silent meditation in which to walk alongside it and allow it to put down the work of keeping me calm and distracted and safe; I was able to show it where I was in life, and how I have learned to appreciate silence very much in my life (rampant Squirrel Brain during my own meditation notwithstanding). My Storyteller seemed to appreciate that understanding and was quite happy to walk along with me without needing to spin a yarn as if to keep a small child entertained. It was a lovely moment.

Do you have an internal Storyteller? Are there polished pieces of your own experiences that you keep reciting time and time again? Is there a part of you that prefers to think its way through experiences rather than feel them? Are there rich, old narratives that flow into those silent moments to accompany you when the silence feels somehow like it’s too much? What else might you be wary or afraid of encountering in those moments of silence?

One Comment to “Walking in Silence with Storytellers”

  1. Leanne

    So… I related to this question ” Is there a part of you that prefers to think its way through experiences rather than feel them?” more than you can possibly imagine. Karen, a very interesting read overall for me and I will be thinking about this post when I enter my Storyteller mode this evening at bedtime.

    Reply

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